Friday, 18 August 2017

Push authentication can replace the password

For a vestige of the past, the password has managed to hold on and remain alive -- even though some of the top people in computing said that it had already died over a decade ago. In one of his more famous predictions, Microsoft founder Bill Gates said that passwords were on the way out already in 2004. Problem is that Gates, for all his wisdom, didn’t tell us what to use to replace passwords. "There is no doubt that over time, people are going to rely less and less on passwords," Gates said at the RSA conference in 2004. "People… [Continue Reading]


Read the full article here by Betanews

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Intel’s self-driving supergroup brings Fiat Chrysler into the fold

Intel's self-driving supergroup has added another member to the team: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA). The partnership, which already includes BMW, Intel and Mobileye, has ambitious plans to get autonomous vehicles on the road by 2021, and FCA's inclusion is likely to make that goal more achievable.

FCA already has a decent chunk of autonomous expertise under its belt -- it partnered with Waymo (formerly Google) in 2016, adding 100 self-driving Pacifica minivans to the Waymo fleet -- but compared to its rivals the group lags behind. The new partnership gives the company access to the research and resources it needs to keep pace in the field.

But FCA brings something useful to the table, too. Scalability remains an issue for autonomous vehicles -- that is, making the technology work with different makes and models. FCA owns a number of very different brands, including Chrysler, Fiat and Jeep, so the partnership can now work towards autonomy across the board, from Jeeps used off-road to Fiats designed for zooming around cities.

The partnership aims to have 40 self-driving test vehicles on public roads by the end of 2017 -- a small step towards its grander plans to have Level 3 and Level 4/5 self-driving cars in production by 2021. FCA made a smart move getting involved at this stage -- no doubt other manufacturers will soon be looking for a piece of the action as well.

Via: The Verge



Read the full article here by Engadget

Monday, 14 August 2017

Bitcoin Has Passed $4,000

It was only last week that Bitcoin passed $3,000 for the first time, but now it's trading at over $4,000. Some say that the creation of Bitcoin Cash and the adoption of SegWit (which allows for more transactions) were responsible for the recent surge, having boosted confidence in the cryptocurrency's future. Wall Street's obsession with Bitcoin and its constant reporting may also be fueling the craze. So what happens next? No one knows. Bitcoin could crash 50% to $2,000 tomorrow or spike to $5,000 - and I don't think anyone who truly knows crypto would be surprised at either option. Everyone has a different opinion - some say the bubble is oversized and should have popped months ago - others think that bitcoin is currently just a fraction of what it could eventually trade at. Whichever camp you fall in, here's one friendly reminder: don't invest more than you can afford to lose - because if you ask anyone who's spent more than a few months in the cryptocurrency world they'll tell you it's a roller coaster. Discussion

Read the full article here by [H]ardOCP News/Article Feed

Sunday, 13 August 2017

Intel EOLs Atom Chip Used for Microsoft HoloLens

Intel is discontinuing the processor used in Microsoft's HoloLens this Fall: customers have been asked to place their final orders on the Atom x5-Z8100P SoC by September 30, as final shipments will be made on October 30. The current-generation HoloLens was released last year with this very same Atom chip, and there is little word on what Microsoft will replace it with, being that the successor has been architected differently and tipped to run an AI co-processor. While the device will run Windows 10 and will be equipped with an HPU, it will also feature an AI co-processor integrated into the latter that will use neural networks to enable object and voice recognition skills without the need for an Internet connection. The HPU 2.0 with the programmable AI co-processor will be a self-sufficient device that will run on battery power of the next HoloLens (hence, its power consumption will not be too high). The HPU 2.0 and the AI co-processor were designed entirely in-house and therefore are tailored for usage model of the HoloLens. Discussion

Read the full article here by [H]ardOCP News/Article Feed

Studio Ghibli reopens for Hayao Miyazaki's new film

Just a few years ago, Studio Ghibli's future was in the air after co-founder and legendary animator Hayao Miyazaki (supposedly) retired. The place is about to be jumping again, however, as the studio announced that it has re-opened to start production on a recently-announced new film by the not-so-retired Miyazaki. He was on hand for a small ceremony on July 3rd, where he "brought together his main collaborators already engaged on his new feature film to talk to them about the project," the company said in a news release (translated).

A re-opening normally wouldn't be newsworthy, but at one point, it seemed like Studio Ghibli -- behind masterpieces like Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke and Howl's Moving Castle -- would not produce any more films. Recently, however, Amazon announced that it would stream Ronja, the Robber's Daughter, a children's TV series directed by Miyazaki's son Goro. Shortly after that came the news that the studio would produce a new film directed by Hayao Miyazaki.

Studio Ghibli hasn't released any details about the film itself, but many fans think it will be an adaptation of Miyazaki's first CGI short film Boro the Caterpillar. That short was delayed, but producer Toshio Suzuki has said it will likely be released in 2019 ahead of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic games.

Miyazaki has threatened retirement before, and when he stepped down in 2013, the company announced it would restructure for the next generation of animators. The films, while beloved by animation aficionados and cineastes, have never made tons of money -- Studio Ghibli's best-grossing film was Spirited Away, which made $275 million back in 2001.

Over the years, however, the films have gained a much larger following thanks to streaming and DVD, so the new one will likely be met with unprecedented anticipation. Adding to that, Miyazaki will be 80 when it's completed, so this could definitely be his last film.

Via: Indie Wire

Source: Buta Connection (Facebook)



Read the full article here by Engadget

Friday, 11 August 2017

Mazda Will Bring the First Compression Ignition Gasoline Engine to Market


Diesel cars, no longer popular in Europe, are definitely a pariah in the US. Americans never warmed to them, and VW's scheme to dupe millions of customers and pollute the planet didn't help. But diesels provide better fuel economy than gasoline engines, even if they do emit more pollution. The ideal internal combustion engine, then, would combine the efficiency of a diesel with the (relatively) lower emissions of a gasoline engine.

Automotive engineers have spent decades trying to build just such an engine. Mazda just announced it's finally done it.

The Japanese automaker says the Skyactiv-X will be the world’s first commercially available compression ignition gasoline engine. I'll explain the tech in a moment, but the big takeaway is Mazda claims the engine is 20 to 30 percent more efficient than its current gas engines, and at least as efficient, if not more so, than its diesel engines.

This Skyactiv-X is part of Mazda's goofily titled "Sustainable Zoom-Zoom 2030" plan that includes a shift toward electric cars beginning in 2019. But Mazda knows EVs won't dominate the market anytime soon, and this engineering breakthrough suggests the auto industry isn't quite done improving internal combustion.

A New Kind of Boom

First, a primer for those of you who aren't petrolheads. Internal combustion engines, whether they burn gasoline or diesel fuel, generate power by compressing air in the cylinder, adding fuel, and detonating the mixture. That creates a small explosion, which forces a piston down, turning the crankshaft, and, through the drivetrain, the wheels. Gasoline engines use a spark plug to create the explosion. Diesel engines compress that air to a much greater degree, making the air inside the cylinder hot enough to detonate the fuel without a spark. That higher compression ratio means higher efficiency from the engine, or more miles from the fuel. Advantage: diesel.

In gas engines, the fuel is injected earlier, and the air is kept cooler with a lower compression ratio. That means everything is mixed better, resulting in a cleaner burn that produces fewer particulates (soot, basically) and less nitrogen oxide (which is linked to asthma and other respiratory problems). Advantage: gasoline.

Efficiency-minded automakers constantly strive to elevate the compression ratio in gas engines, but are limited by something called auto-ignition (aka knocking), which is when the heat causes the fuel to detonate at the wrong time. But engineers have also been working on embracing auto-ignition, which would allow them to run an engine at even higher compression, and get that increase in efficiency.

Such an engine is great in theory and usually works in a laboratory. General Motors, Honda, and Hyundai have even demonstrated variations on the theme in prototypes over the last decade. And Formula 1 cars use the technology.

But compression ignition is difficult to control outside of a lab, or the cost-no-object arena of F1 racing. Those explosions happen whenever the fuel and air mix reach a given temperature, so engineers sacrifice the millisecond-precise control of spark plugs. The engines are rough when cold, unpredictable when pushed hard, and too often noisy and rattly. Not exactly market-ready.

Mazda hasn't given full details on how it cracked this conundrum, but computers can help. A sophisticated system can control the temperature and pressure in each cylinder by varying turbo boost or valve timing. It can mix in exhaust gas to change the mixture of fuel and air, and calculate just the right amount of gas to throw in.

Plus, Mazda didn't completely abandon current technology. The Skyactiv-X uses something Mazda calls "spark controlled compression ignition," which means the engine has spark plugs and uses them when necessary, like when the engine is cold. It promises a seamless hand-off between sparking and spark-free driving modes. Just how well it works remains to be seen, but you'll be able to judge for yourself, when the first cars with the new engine go on sale in 2019.



Read the full article here by Wired Top Stories

Ethereum Ethminer Performance With Radeon & GeForce OpenCL - August 2017

Here are my latest Ethereum Ethminer benchmarks for those interested in mining this cryptocurrency using OpenCL on AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce GPUs.

These are my latest Ethereum mining benchmarks that just finished up this morning. Radeon tests were done using the latest ROCm binaries on Ubuntu 16.04. The Radeon cards tested were the R9 290, RX 480, RX 560, RX 580, and R9 Fury. Yes, there will be Ethereum benchmarks on the Radeon RX Vega on launch day when that time comes. On the NVIDIA side was their 384.59 driver on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS with the GeForce GTX 960, GTX 970, GTX 980, GTX 980 Ti, GTX 1050, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, GTX 1080, and GTX 1080 Ti.

All the benchmarks were facilitated via the

Phoronix Test Suite

.

Additionally, the Phoronix Test Suite was monitoring GPU temperatures, AC system power consumption, and generating performance-per-Watt metrics.

Vega could quite possibly beat the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti with Ethminer given AMD's strong OpenCL performance with ROCm. It will be interesting to see later this month. Anyhow, this is the current state of things with the latest OpenCL Linux drivers.

Here were the GPU temperatures during testing... Of course, the GPU temperatures can vary a lot depending upon the AIB's cooling system and/or after-market cooling.

And the overall AC system power consumption during the Ethereum benchmarking process.

Very interestingly, the performance-per-Watt. This should be another interesting metric with Vega, but for now the GeForce GTX 1070 is leading when its comes to efficiency.

A Phoronix Test Suite module also provided the current performance-per-dollar for Ethereum GPU mining, but this is a bit of a mess considering the lack of availability currently for most Radeon Polaris graphics cards... Prices for both NVIDIA and AMD were based on selections at Amazon.

Stay tuned for more interesting tests ahead.



Read the full article here by Phoronix

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Android 8.0 gets "streaming OS updates"

When you get that "out of space" error message during an update, you're only "out of space" on the user storage partition, which is just being used as a temporary download spot before the update is applied to the system partition. Starting with Android 8.0, the A/B system partition setup is being upgraded with a "streaming updates" feature. Update data will arrive from the Internet directly to the offline system partition, written block by block, in a ready-to-boot state. Instead of needing ~1GB of free space, Google will be bypassing user storage almost entirely, needing only ~100KB worth of free space for some metadata. I promise not to make some snide remark about Android's update mess.

Read the full article here by OSNews

(PR) Intel Unveils Full Intel Core X-series Processor Family Specs; 14- to 18-Core


Today, Intel is releasing the specifications for the 12- to 18-core processors: Intel Core i9-7920X, Intel Core i9-7940X, Intel Core i9-7960X and the Extreme Edition Intel Core i9-7980XE processors. Announced at Computex 2017, the Intel Core X-series processor family is the most powerful, scalable and accessible high-end desktop platform offered by Intel, designed to deliver the performance needed to meet extreme computing demands for virtual reality (VR), content creation, gaming and overclocking.

The new X-series processor family is the ultimate platform for content creators and gamers. Multitasking becomes extreme mega-tasking with simultaneous, compute-intensive, multithreaded workloads aligned in purpose, powered by up to 18 cores and 36 threads. And, with up to 68 PCIe 3.0 lanes on the platform, people have the ability to expand their systems with fast SSDs, up to four discrete GFX cards and ultrafast Thunderbolt 3 solutions.

Content creators can expect up to 20 percent better performance for VR content creation and up to 30 percent faster 4K video editing over the previous generation. This means less time waiting and more time designing new worlds and experiences. Gamers and enthusiasts will experience up to 30 percent faster extreme mega-tasking for gaming over the previous generation.

The 12-core Intel Core X-series processor will be available starting on Aug. 28, and 14- to 18-core Intel Core X-series processors will be available starting Sept. 25. The 4- to 10-core Intel Core X-series processors are already on shelves and available at multiple retailers, along with more than 200 Intel X299 Chipset motherboards.



Read the full article here by techPowerUp!

Monday, 7 August 2017

How to Screw Up Autonomous Cars

Holy crap! Turn any stop sign into a 45mph speed limit sign, as far as some driverless cars are concerned. Actually if you read through the article, this sort of thing will certainly have to be dealt with. I know no [H] readers would do this....well, strike that. This Car and Driver blog is worth a read. UW computer-security researcher Yoshi Kohno described an attack algorithm that uses printed images stuck on road signs. These images confuse the cameras on which most self-driving vehicles rely. In one example, explained in a document uploaded to the open-source scientific-paper site arXiv last week, small stickers attached to a standard stop sign caused a vision system to misidentify it as a Speed Limit 45 sign. Discussion

Read the full article here by [H]ardOCP News/Article Feed

Saturday, 5 August 2017

Quake 2 With Realtime GPU Pathtracing

Edd Biddulph, computer graphics programmer has released a video showing his from-scratch GPU-based pathtracer created specifically for Quake 2. Despite running on a Titan Xp there is some noise, which is inevitable on today's hardware. By Biddulph's estimates, it will be another 15-20 years before GPU hardware is powerful enough to do real time path or ray tracing. I'll be honest, before seeing this and doing a little digging, I didn't know much about raytracing and pathtracing. Having learned a bit more this is quite incredible, and despite the YouTube compression, you can really see the impressive lighting effects coming from this 20 year old game. You can find the source code for this GPU pathtracer on GitHub This is a from-scratch GPU-based pathtracer created specifically for Quake 2. It has several optimisations which are only viable due to the typical characteristics of Quake 2 such as support for parallogram-shaped lightsources, BSP ray traversal, and special handling of sky 'surfaces' (portals). It doesn't officially have a name, but you can call it Raylgun. Discussion

Read the full article here by [H]ardOCP News/Article Feed

Thursday, 3 August 2017

Functional World

Functional World

Read the full article here by turnoff.us - geek comic site

Epic Games Is Planning To Use Vulkan By Default For Unreal Engine On Linux

Epic Games has an interesting goal of eventually being able to use the Vulkan graphics API by default on Linux systems running the Unreal Engine.

Epic developers are still working on improving the Vulkan renderer and tweaking it for better performance and on visual/feature parity to Direct3D 11. With the upcoming Unreal Engine 4.17 release will be more Vulkan improvements.

While Windows gamers will continue seeing Direct3D used by default, Epic Games is hoping to see their Vulkan renderer eventually be the default when running this game engine on Linux systems, but for now OpenGL is the default.

This was one of the interesting tidbits of information during yesterday's

Khronos SIGGRAPH 2017 event

. The Vulkan/OpenGL recording is embedded below.

VIDEO



Read the full article here by Phoronix

The Drummer John Bonham

What Makes John Bonham Such a Good Drummer?..(Read...)



Read the full article here by Likecool

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

How to Write, Package and Distribute a Library in Python


Python is a great programming language, but packaging is one of its weakest points. It is a well-known fact in the community. Installing, importing, using and creating packages has improved a lot over the years, but it's still not on par with newer languages like Go and Rust that learned a lot from the struggles of Python and other mature languages. 

In this tutorial, you'll learn everything you need to know about writing, packaging and distributing your own packages. 

How to Write a Python Library

A Python library is a coherent collection of Python modules that is organized as a Python package. In general, that means that all modules live under the same directory and that this directory is on the Python search path. 

Let's quickly write a little Python 3 package and illustrate all these concepts.

The Pathology Package

Python 3 has an excellent Path object, which is a huge improvement over Python 2's awkward os.path module. But it's missing one crucial capability—finding the path of the current script. This is very important when you want to locate access files relative to the current script. 

In many cases, the script can be installed in any location, so you can't use absolute paths, and the working directory can be set to any value, so you can't use a relative path. If you want to access a file in a sub-directory or parent directory, you must be able to figure out the current script directory. 

Here is how you do it in Python:

To access a file called 'file.txt' in a 'data' sub-directory of the current script's directory, you can use the following code: print(open(str(script_dir/'data/file.txt').read())

With the pathology package, you have a built-in script_dir method, and you use it like this:

Yep, it's a mouthful. The pathology package is very simple. It derives its own Path class from pathlib's Path and adds a static script_dir() that always returns the path of the calling script. 

Here is the implementation:

Due to the cross-platform implementation of pathlib.Path, you can derive directly from it and must derive from a specific sub-class (PosixPath or WindowsPath). The script dir resolution uses the inspect module to find the caller and then its filename attribute.

Testing the Pathology Package

Whenever you write something that is more than a throwaway script, you should test it. The pathology module is no exception. Here are the tests using the standard unit test framework: 

The Python Path

Python packages must be installed somewhere on the Python search path to be imported by Python modules. The Python search path is a list of directories and is always available in sys.path. Here is my current sys.path:

Note that the first empty line of the output represents the current directory, so you can import modules from the current working directory, whatever it is. You can directly add or remove directories to/from sys.path. 

You can also define a PYTHONPATH environment variable, and there a few other ways to control it. The standard site-packages is included by default, and this is where packages you install using via pip go. 

How to Package a Python Library

Now that we have our code and tests, let's package it all into a proper library. Python provides an easy way via the setup module. You create a file called setup.py in your package's root directory. Then, to create a source distribution, you run: python setup.py sdist

To create a binary distribution called a wheel, you run: python setup.py bdist_wheel

Here is the setup.py file of the pathology package:

It includes a lot of metadata in addition to the 'packages' item that uses the find_packages() function imported from setuptools to find sub-packages.

Let's build a source distribution:

The warning is because I used a non-standard README.md file. It's safe to ignore. The result is a tar-gzipped file under the dist directory:

And here is a binary distribution:

The pathology package contains only pure Python modules, so a universal package can be built. If your package includes C extensions, you'll have to build a separate wheel for each platform:

For a deeper dive into the topic of packaging Python libraries, check out How to Write Your Own Python Packages.

How to Distribute a Python Package

Python has a central package repository called PyPI (Python Packages Index). When you install a Python package using pip, it will download the package from PyPI (unless you specify a different repository). To distribute our pathology package, we need to upload it to PyPI and provide some extra metadata PyPI requires. The steps are:

  • Create an account on PyPI (just once).
  • Register your package.
  • Upload your package.

Create an Account

You can create an account on the PyPI website. Then create a .pypirc file in your home directory:

For testing purposes, you can add a "pypitest" index server to your .pypirc file:

Register Your Package

If this is the first release of your package, you need to register it with PyPI. Use the register command of setup.py. It will ask you for your password. Note that I point it to the test repository here:

Upload Your Package

Now that the package is registered, we can upload it. I recommend using twine, which is more secure. Install it as usual using pip install twine. Then upload your package using twine and provide your password (redacted below):

For a deeper dive into the topic of distributing your packages, check out How to Share Your Python Packages.

Conclusion

In this tutorial, we went through the fully fledged process of writing a Python library, packaging it, and distributing it through PyPI. At this point, you should have all the tools to write and share your libraries with the world.

Additionally, don’t hesitate to see what we have available for sale and for study in the marketplace, and please ask any questions and provide your valuable feedback using the feed below.



Read the full article here by Nettuts+

Tuesday, 1 August 2017

Microsoft Won't Patch 20-Yr-Old SMBv1 Vulnerability (You Should Just Turn the Service Off)

An anonymous reader shares a news post: Following the recent WannaCry and Petya ransomware attacks, Microsoft recommended all Windows 10 users to remove the unused but vulnerable SMBv1 file sharing protocol from their PCs. This is because both variants of the ransomware actually used the same SMBv1 exploit to replicate through network systems, even though it seems that Petya mostly affected Windows PCs in Ukraine. Anyway, if you haven't turned off the protocol on the PC already, you really should: Not only because new WannaCry/Petya variants could once again use the same vulnerability again to encrypt your files, but because another 20-year-old flaw has just been unveiled during the recent DEF CON hacker conference. The SMB security flaw called "SMBLoris" was discovered by security researchers at RiskSense, who explained that it can lead to DoS attacks affecting every version of the SMB protocol and all versions of Windows since Windows 2000. More importantly, a Raspberry Pi and just 20 lines of Python code are enough to put a Windows server to its knees.
Share on Google+

Read more of this story at Slashdot.



Read the full article here by Slashdot

Monday, 31 July 2017

Russian censorship law bans proxies and VPNs

It's going to be much harder to view the full web in Russia before the year is out. President Putin has signed a law that, as of November 1st, bans technology which lets you access banned websites, including virtual private networks and proxies. Internet providers will have to block websites hosting these tools. The measure is ostensibly meant to curb extremist content, but that's just pretext -- this is really about preventing Russians from seeing content that might be critical of Putin, not to mention communicating in secret.

Accordingly, the President has signed another law requiring that chat apps identify users through their phone numbers after January 1st, 2018. Some messaging clients already encourage you to attach an account to a phone number, but this makes it mandatory -- Facebook and others can't reject the idea if they're prefer to give you some kind of anonymity. The measure also demands that operators limit users' access if they're spreading illegal material.

The timing likely isn't coincidental. Russia is holding a presidential election in March, and banning technology like VPNs will make it harder for voters to see news that questions Putin's authority. Likewise, you may be less likely to organize a protest if you know that the police can trace anonymous chats back to you through your phone number. As with China's VPN crackdown, Russian officials are trying to control the online conversation at a crucial moment to make sure the powers that be go unchallenged.

Via: RadioFreeEurope, Reuters

Source: Gov.ru (translated 1), (2)



Read the full article here by Engadget

Sunday, 30 July 2017

F1 | Orgoglio Vettel: “Ricordiamoci dove eravamo 12 mesi fa”

Sebastian Vettel ha conquistato la pole position del Gran Premio d’Ungheria, precedendo il compagno di squadra Kimi Raikkonen. Su un...

Read the full article here by FormulaPassion.it

F1 | Di Resta: “Fantastico guidare le auto migliori al mondo”

Di Resta, attuale pilota del DTM e commentatore per la tv inglese in questo GP di Ungheria – ha preso il...

Read the full article here by FormulaPassion.it